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Interlinked Dictionary© based on 
Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary (m-w.com)
and Star Dictionary
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doxology.noun,.plural.doxologies
an expression of praise to God, especially a short hymn sung as part of a Christian.worship.gathering
doxologically.adverb

disentangle, disentangled, disentangling, disentangles.verbs
transitive verb use.to extricate from entanglement or involvement; free; to clear up or resolve (get the kids to disentangle the clothes left on their floor); unravel
intransitive verb use.to become free of entanglement disentanglement.noun,.plural.disentanglements

dibs.plural noun
a claim; rights (can I have dibs on that last piece of pie)

democracy.noun,.plural.democracies
ideally, it's people considered as the primary source of political power by means of majority rule, that is, the majority wants this done a certain way and it then must be followed; democracy is the name given for such a thing, but in reality is often a snow job, hiding the nefarious attempts to subjugate the population; democracy was originally intended to be a form governing by the people, having control of all which may affect them and responds and adjusts to the will of the people by laying down rules government must follow for the benefit of all and if not, those elected into governing positions are removed from office); the principles of social equality and respect for the individual within a community; government by the people, exercised either directly or through elected representatives; a political or social unit that has such a government; compare republicanism
democrat.noun,.plural.democrats
an advocate of democracy; a member of a democratic party
democratic.adjective
of, characterized by or advocating democracy; of or for the people in general; believing in or practicing social equality; of, relating.to.or.characteristic of a democratic party
democratically.adverb

denture.noun,.plural.dentures
a partial or complete set of artificial teeth for either the upper or lower jaw; also called dental plate; a complete set of removable artificial teeth for both the upper and lower jaw
dental.adjective
of, relating to or for the teeth (a dental.appliance)

doctorate.noun,.plural.doctorates
the degree or status of a doctor rank as conferred by a university, rising to that level after attaining both a bachelor's degree and a master's degree and then an additional approximate 3 years of study; designation is Ph.D.

dish.noun,.plural.dishes
a dish is a shallow.concave.container with a wide uncovered top; you eat and serve food from dishes and cook food in them (dishes made of glass are best for cooking and/or serving hot foods; washed the dishes); the food served or contained in a dish is also called a dish (what dishes are you cooking for tonight?; is there going to be a dish of your home made coconut ice cream for us after dinner?); a particular.variety or preparation of food (soup having vegetables that one has roasted is a good dish for a cold winter evening)
dish, dishes, dished, dishing.verbs
transitive verb use.to serve food in or as if in a dish (dished up the potatoes); to present (dished up some excellent entertainment); to hollow out; make concave
dish out.phrasal verb
to give out (dished out a lot of good advice)

drain, drained, draining, drains.verbs
if you drain a liquid from a place or object, you remove the liquid by causing it to flow somewhere else; if a liquid drains somewhere, it flows there (they built the tunnel to drain water out); if you drain a place or object, you dry it by causing water to flow out of it; if a place or object drains, water flows out of it until it is dry (when the soil drains freely, slugs aren't a problem; if you drain food or if food drains, you remove the liquid that it has been in, especially after it has been cooked or soaked in water (drain the pasta well after cooking it or it will dilute the sauce you put on; wash the leeks thoroughly and allow them to drain; a drain is a pipe that carries water or sewage away from a place (he built his own house and laid his own drains); if the color or the blood drains or is drained from someone's face, they become very pale; you can also say that someone's face drains or is drained of color
transitive verb use.to draw off a liquid by a gradual.process (drained water from the sink); to cause liquid to go out from; to empty (drained the bathtub; drain the pond); to deplete
intransitive verb use.to flow off or out (water drained slowly through the sieve onto the flowers from the tilted can; to become empty by the drawing off of liquid (watched the tub slowly drain); to discharge surface or excess water (the Niagara River drains into Lake Ontario); to dwindle (felt his energy draining as the night meeting wore on)
drain.noun,.plural.drains
a pipe or channel by which liquid is drawn off; something that causes a gradual loss
drainpipe.noun,.plural.drainpipes
a pipe for carrying off water or sewage
down the drain.idiom
to or into the condition of being wasted or lost (our plans to visit the volcano went down the drain when it erupted)
drainable.adjective
drainer.noun,.plural.drainers

defecate, defecated, defecating, defecates.verbs
intransitive verb use.to void.feces from the bowels
transitive verb use.to remove impurities, as in a chemical solution; clarify
defecator.noun,.plural.defecators

drove.noun,.plural.droves
a large amount (droves of people); in droves (tourists come in droves to see Banff National Park in Alberta); a drove is also a  group of animals that are being moved together (a drove of cattle); a large mass of people moving or acting as a body

drive, drives, driving, drove, driven.verbs
driven is.past participle.of drive
driven.adjective
piled up or carried.along by a current (driven snow huddled against the fence); motivated by or having a compulsive.quality or need; an innate.urge to action that can be either good or evil depending on one's decision (she was driven to fulfil her needs in ways that eventually led her into trouble; a driven person, such as a workaholic, can miss much of life's journey)
intransitive verb use.to move along or advance quickly as if pushed by an impelling force; to rush, dash or advance violently against an obstruction (the wind drove into my face); to operate a vehicle, such as a car; to go or be transported in a vehicle (drove to the supermarket)
drive.noun,.plural.drives
when you drive somewhere, you operate a car or other vehicle and control its movement and direction (he drove into town to take her out to dinner; she is still learning to drive)
Computers: a device that reads data from and writes data onto a storage medium, such as a hard disk

dig, dug, digging, digs.verbs
transitive verb use.to break up, turn over or remove earth or sand, for example, as with a shovel, a spade or the hands; to make or form by removing earth or other material (dug my way out of the snow); to obtain or unearth by digging (an archaeological dig; dig coal; a dog digging bones); to learn or discover by careful research or investigation (dug up the evidence of an ancient.civilization; dug out the facts); to poke or prod (dug me in the ribs to alert me to the funny situation he didn't want to speak about at the moment); to like, enjoy or appreciate ("They really dig our music and daddy, I dig swinging for them"....Louis Armstrong, famous trumpet player); to take notice of (dig that wild outfit)
intransitive verb use.to loosen, turn over or remove earth or other material; to make one's way by or as if by pushing aside or removing material (dug through the files)
dig.noun,.plural.digs
a poke or thrust (a sharp dig in the ribs); a sarcastic, taunting remark; a gibe; an archaeological excavation
dig in.phrasal verb
to begin to eat heartily; to begin to work intensively; to hold on stubbornly, as to a position; entrench oneself; to dig trenches for protection; from Middle English 'diggen', perhaps.akin to.Old French 'digue' meaning 'dike', 'trench'

dry, drier.or.dryer, driest.or.dryest.adjectives
free from liquid or moisture (changed to dry clothes; having or characterized.by little or no rain (a dry climate); marked by the absence of natural or normal moisture (a dry month); not under water (dry land); having all the water or liquid drained away, evaporated or exhausted (a dry river; evaporated milk); lacking a mucous or watery discharge (a dry cough); no longer wet (the paint is dry); of or relating to solid rather than liquid.substances  or commodities (dry weight); not sweet as a result of the decomposition of sugar during fermentation (a dry wine); having a large proportion of strong liquor to other ingredients (a dry martini); eaten or served without butter, gravy or other garnish (dry toast); lacking tenderness, warmth or involvement; severe (the actor gave a dry reading of the lines); wearisome; dull (a dry lecture); humorous or sarcastic in a shrewd, impersonal way (dry wit); someone with a dry sense of humor says funny and clever things while seeming to be serious; constructed without mortar or cement (dry masonry)
dry, dried, drying, dries.verbs
transitive verb use.to remove the moisture from; make dry (laundry dried by the Sun on a clothesline outside)
intransitive verb use.to become dry (the bed sheets dried quickly in the Sun)
dry.noun,.plural.drys
one who doesn't drink alcohol
dry out.phrasal verb
to allow moisture to evaporate (sat in the Sun to dry out after swimming)
dry up.phrasal verb
to make or become unproductive, especially to do so gradually; to stop talking (I wish he would dry up so there's time for others to speak)
dry as a bone.idiom
very dry
dryly.or.drily.adverb
dryness.noun
dryish.adjective
not totally dry yet
dryable.adjective
able to be dehydrated

dragon.noun,.plural.dragons
any of various.lizards, such as the Komodo dragon for one example; a monster represented in mythology as a huge winged reptile with a crested head, often spouting fire; a woman who behaves in an angry, unfriendly way; in the Bible, is the name of some unknown creature inhabiting desert places 
and ruins (Isaiah 13:22; 34:13; Jeremiah 10:22); also some great sea monster (Jeremiah 51:34); in Genesis 1:21 the Hebrew word 'dragon' is translated 'whales' and translated serpent in Exodus 7:9; in the New Testament the word 'dragon' is found only in Revelation 12th chapter and is there used metaphorically of Satan

downpour.noun,.plural.downpours
a heavy fall of rain

down.adverb
from a higher to a lower place or position (hiked up then down the mountain's side); toward or in the south; southward (flew down to Florida); away from a place considered central or a center of activity, such as a city or town (down on the farm); to or in a quiescent or subdued.state (calmed down); in or into an inactive or inoperative state (the generators went down at midnight); seriously or vigorously (got down to the project at hand); from earlier times or people (stories handed down from one generation to the next); to a reduced or concentrated form (pared the term paper down to five pages; briefly took the notes down); in partial payment at the time of purchase (put ten dollars down on the necklace); into or toward a secure position (nailed down the boards; bolted the furniture down)
down.adjective
moving or directed downward (a down elevator); low or lower (food prices were down today); reduced; diminished (the wind is down now); malfunctioning or not operating (the computer is down; the Internet is down); low in spirits; depressed (she was feeling a little down today); in baseball, retired; out (two down in the last of the ninth); completed; done (three down, two to go); learned or known perfectly (had the spelling down pat)
down.noun
a downward movement; descent; in football, any of a series of four plays (in U.S.A; 3 in Canada) during which a team must advance at least ten yards to retain possession of the ball

downward.adverb
toward a direction that is the opposite of up; from a higher to a lower place; moving to a lower level or condition; descending from a source or beginning (passed downward through the ages)
downward.adjective
pointing towards a lower level (the downward slope of a hill; the downward trend in quality of life; the downward path to the river)
downwards.adverb
downwardly.adverb
downwardness.noun
down, downed, downing, downs.verbs
transitive verb use.to bring, put, strike or throw down; to swallow hastily; gulp (downed the glass of water)
intransitive verb use.to go or come down; descend

down in the mouth.idiom
discouraged; downcast; sad; dejected
down on.idiom
hostile or negative toward; ill-disposed to (was down on jogging after the injury)
down on one's luck.idiom
afflicted by misfortune
down the drain.idiom
to or into the condition of being wasted or lost (our plans to visit the volcano went down the drain when it erupted)
down to earth.adjective
practical and realistic; level headed

down.noun,.plural.downs
fine, soft, fluffy feathers forming the first plumage of a young bird and underlying the contour feathers in certain adult birds

down.noun,.plural.downs
an expanse of rolling, grassy, treeless upland used for grazing
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