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Interlinked Dictionary© based on 
Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary (m-w.com)
and Star Dictionary
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jagged.adjective
something that is jagged has a rough, uneven shape or edge with lots of sharp points (a worn saw has jagged edges; jagged black cliffs); marked by irregular projections and indentations on the edge or surface; rough
jaggedly.adverb
jaggedness.noun
jag.noun,.plural.jags
a sharp.projection; a barb
jag, jagged, jagging, jags.transitive verbs
to cut jags in; notch; to cut unevenly
jagger.noun,.plural.jaggers
jagless.adjective

Jenner, Edward.1749-1823. British physician and vaccination.pioneer. His observations bypassed.research on healthy immune system functioning.in favor of a vaccine he invented and believed would prevent smallpox using substance from cowpox.lesions to be injected into a person's blood stream; Jenner stupidly followed the ridiculous.advice of an obviously careless person named John Hunter, a medical surgeon that he came to know, who told him."Why think, why not experiment."

Comprised with information from Encyclopedia Britannica:

The only means of combating smallpox Jenner was aware of, was a primitive form of vaccination called variolation, which involved intentionally infecting a healthy person with the disease matter taken from a sick patient. At that time, no doubt for reasons of ego.(some so-called professionals seem to have a hard time if their limelight might be dimmed, such as in the case of the crook Louis Pasteur), it didn't seem to dawn on them that proper sanitation was of paramount importance.

"There is no question that our health has improved spectacularly in the past century. One thing seems certain; it did not happen because of medicine or medical science or even the presence of doctors. Much of the credit should go to the plumbers and engineers of the western world. The contamination of drinking water by human feces was at one time the greatest cause of human disease and death for us...but when the plumbers and sanitary engineers had done their work in the construction of our cities, these diseases began to vanish."....Lewis Thomas, medical researcher and essayist.

The practice, which originated in China and India, was based on two assumptions: first, that one attack of smallpox effectively protected against any subsequent attack and, second, that a person deliberately infected with a seemingly mild case of the disease should safely acquire such protection. It was, in present-day terminology, an 'elective' infection, that is, one given to a person in good health. Unfortunately, the transmitted disease did not always remain mild and mortality occurred. Furthermore, the infected person could pass the disease onto others and thus was a carrier and spreader of infection.

Jenner concluded that cowpox not only protected against smallpox but could be transmitted from one person to another as a deliberate mechanism of protection. Never mind the infecton aspect, Edward Jenner was none to bright.

In May 1796 Jenner found a young dairymaid, Sarah Nelmes, who had fresh cowpox lesions on her hand. On May 14, using matter from Sarah's lesions, he injected his concoction into an eight-year-old boy, James Phipps, who had never had smallpox. Phipps became ill over the course of the next 9 days but seemed  well on the 10th. Phipps obviously had a decent immune system. On July 1 Jenner inoculated the boy again, this time with smallpox matter. No disease developed; and he assumed that protection was complete. In 1798 Jenner wrote about all this in the book entitled An Inquiry into the Causes and Effects of the Variolae Vaccinae.

The reaction to the publication was not immediately favourable. Difficulties arose, some of them quite unpleasant. Complications were many. Vaccination seemed simple, but the vast number of persons who practiced it did not necessarily follow the procedure that Jenner had recommended and deliberate or unconscious innovations often impaired the effectiveness. Pure cowpox vaccine was not always easy to obtain, nor was it easy to preserve or transmit. Furthermore, the biological factors that produce immunity were not yet understood; much information had yet to be gathered and in retrospect, should have been before embarking on the experimental road of vaccinations.

jaw.noun,.plural.jaws
either of two bony or cartilaginous.structures that in most vertebrates form the framework of the mouth and hold the teeth;  the mandible or maxilla or the part of the face covering these bones; either of two opposed hinged parts in a mechanical device such as a vise
jaw, jawed, jawing, jaws.intransitive verbs
to talk; jabber; converse

Jerusalem.noun
the capital of Israel, in the east-central part of the country in the West Bank. Of immense religious and historical importance, the city was occupied as far back as the fourth millennium.B.C.E. and became the capital of King David circa.B.C.E. 1000. Destroyed by Nebuchadnezzar in the sixth century B.C.E., it was later ruled by Greeks, Romans, Persians, Arabs, Crusaders and Turks and by Great Britain under a League of Nations mandate. Israeli forces took control of the city in 1967. Jerusalem is considered a holy city to Jews, Moslems and Christians. Population, 446,500.

joust.noun,.plural.jousts
joust is a word from the 14th century; a combat between two mounted knights or men-at-arms using lances
jousted, jousting, jousts.intransitive verbs
to engage in mounted combat with lances
jouster.noun,.plural.jousters

jingle, jingled, jingling, jingles.verbs
intransitive verb use.to make a tinkling or ringing metallic sound; to have the catchy sound of a simple, repetitious.rhyme
transitive verb use.to cause to make a tinkling or ringing metallic sound (I heard some coins jingling in your pocket)
jingle.noun,.plural.jingles
the sound produced by or as if by bits of metal striking together; a piece of light singsong verse or rhyme; a catchy, often musical advertising slogan; from Middle English ginglen, of imitative.origin
jingly.adjective

jinx.noun,.plural.jinxes
someone or something that brings unwanted circumstances to affect life; a person or thing that is believed to bring bad luck; a condition or period of negative.occurrences that appears to have been caused by a specific person or thing
jinx, jinxed, jinxing, jinxes.transitive verbs
to bring unwanted circumstances into life

Job.noun.(pronounced 'jowb')
Bible:.in the Old Testament.section of the Bible, an upright man whose faith in God survived the test of repeated calamities

job.noun,.plural.jobs.(pronounced 'jawb')
a regular activity, such as one's trade, occupation or profession, performed in exchange for payment (he was adept when it came to construction of homes as he learned many things about them over the years from different jobs)
job, jobbed, jobbing, jobs.verbs
intransitive verb use.to work at odd jobs; to work by the piece (once we finish this job of siding, we'll start on the fence job); to act as a jobber
transitive verb use.to purchase.merchandise from manufacturers and sell it to retailers
jobber.noun,.plural.jobbers
one that buys merchandise from manufacturers and sells it to retailers

jack.noun,.plural.jacks
one who works in a skilled manual trade, such as a lumberjack or steeplejack; in playing a game of cards, the card showing the figure of a servant or soldier and ranking below a queen (also called a knave); a game of jacks played with a set of small six-pointed metal pieces and a small ball, the object being to pick up the pieces in various combinations as quickly as possible as determined by the number of times the ball bounces; the pieces of metal used are also called jacks; a usually portable device for raising heavy objects by means of force applied with a lever, screw or hydraulic press (a jack to raise a vehicle for say, changing a tire); an up and down motion of something such as a jackhammer or jackrabbit; an electrical socket that accepts a plug at one end and attaches to electric circuitry at the other (plug the toaster into the jack in the wall); a small flag flown at the bow of a ship, usually to indicate nationality (the union jack is the flag of the United Kingdom {map})
jack, jacked, jacking, jacks.verbs
transitive verb use.to hoist with a jack (jacked the side of the car to replace the tire; to raise something to a higher level, as in cost (hotels often jack up their prices in tourist season)
intransitive verb used.to hunt or fish by luring.quarry by using a light, this use being called, using a jacklight
jacker.noun,.plural.jackers

javelin.noun,.plural.javelins
a light weight spear, about 8 1/4 feet in length (2.5 meters),  thrown with the hand, used in contests of distance throwing; the athletic field event in which a javelin is thrown

jetsam.noun,.plural.jetsams
cargo or equipment thrown overboard to lighten a ship in distress; discarded cargo or equipment found washed ashore; also see flotsam

jettison, jettisoned, jettisoning, jettisons.transitive verbs
if you jettison something, for example an idea or a plan, you deliberately.reject it or decide not to use it; abandon; to jettison something that is not needed or wanted means to throw it away or get rid of it; discard; to cast away
jettison.noun,.plural.jettisons
the act of discarding or casting overboard; date 1400-1500, Anglo-French 'getteson' and Old French 'getaison' meaning 'act of throwing'

jet stream.noun,.plural.jet streams
a high-speed, meandering wind current, generally moving from a westerly direction at speeds often exceeding 400 kilometers (250 miles) per hour at altitudes of 15 to 25 kilometers (10 to 15 miles)

Jutland.noun
a peninsula of northern Europe comprising mainland Denmark and northern Germany; the people of Jutland were called.Jutes

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