.
.
S i t e  S e a r c h

A_B_C_D_E_F_G_H_I_J_K_L_M_N_O_P_Q_R_S_T_U_V_W_XYZ

List of Topics__Ask Suby__Free Stuff__Questions Lists
Terms of Use__________________Privacy Policy

Interlinked Dictionary© based on 
Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary (m-w.com)
and Star Dictionary
Use the BACK button on your browser to return

hut.noun,.plural.huts
a crude or makeshift.dwelling.or.shelter; a shack; a temporary.structure for shelter usually a small.simple.building with only one or two rooms (a wooden hut); a hut is a small house with only one or two rooms, such as one which is made of wood, mud, grass or stones; a cabin, shanty, shed, shelter (in summer the shepherd lived in a hut near the grazing lands)
hut, hutted, hutting, huts.intransitive.and.transitive verbs
to shelter or take shelter in a hut; a shack; a small, simply constructed dwelling often for temporary or intermittent.occupancy (the shepherds lived in huts in the summer)
hutlike.adjective

hut.interjection
a cadence, "hut, hut, hut" is often said to motivate a group to get on with marching

hiss.noun,.plural.hisses
a sharp, sibilant sound similar to a sustained 's'; a vocal expression.of.disapproval, contempt or dissatisfaction.conveyed by use of this sharp, sibilant sound
hiss, hissed, hissing, hisses.verbs
intransitive verb use.to make a sharp, sibilant sound (the audience booed and hissed when they heard pesticides and the like, were good to use in growing food; the teakettle hissed on the stove)
transitive verb use.to utter with a sharp, sibilant sound; to express a negative.view.or.reaction by uttering a sharp, sibilant sound (the audience hissed its displeasure)
hissingly.adverb
hisser.noun,.plural.hissers

hieroglyph.noun,.plural.hieroglyphs
a picture or symbol used in hieroglyphic writing such as seen on ancient Egyptian walls, monuments and tablets, example; something that suggests a hieroglyph
hieroglyphic.noun,.plural.hieroglyphics
hieroglyphics are symbols in the form of pictures which are used in some writing systems such as those of ancient Sumeria and Egypt
hieroglyphic.or.hieroglyphical.adjective
of, relating.to.or.being a system of writing, such as that of ancient Egypt, in which pictorial symbols are used to represent meaning or sounds or a combination of meaning and sound; from Greek 'hierogluphikos', 'hieros' meaning 'holy' and 'gluph' meaning 'carving'
hieroglyphically.adverb

harpoon.noun,.plural.harpoons
a spearlike weapon with a barbed head used in hunting whales and large fish
harpoon, harpooned, harpooning, harpoons.transitive verbs
to strike, kill or capture with or as if with a spearlike weapon (local fishermem in the small village made harpoons from twigs they sharpened on one end and used in spearing fish for food)
harpooner.noun,.plural.harpooners

hay.noun,.plural.hays
grass or other plants, such as clover or alfalfa, cut and dried for fodder
hay, hayed, haying, hays.verbs
intransitive verb use.to mow and dry grass and herbage for hay
transitive verb use.to make grass into hay; to feed with hay
hayer.noun,.plural.hayers

hamstring.noun,.plural.hamstrings
any of the tendons at the rear hollow of the human knee; also called hamstrings (the hamstring muscle); the large tendon in the back of the hock of a quadruped, such as a horse
hamstring, hamstrung, hamstringing, hamstrings.transitive verbs
if the hamstring of an animal is cut, it can cripple it; to destroy or hinder the efficiency of; to frustrate
hamstrung.verb
past tense and past participle of hamstring

hector.noun,.plural.hectors
a bully
hector, hectored, hectoring, hectors.verbs
intransitive verb use.to behave like a bully; swagger
transitive verb use.to intimidate or dominate in a blustering way

hood.noun,.plural.hoods
a hood is a part of a coat which you can pull up to cover your head and in the shape of a triangular bag attached to the neck of the coat at the back; a loose pliable covering for the head and neck, either attached to a coat or jacket or separate; a sack placed over a falcon's head to keep the bird quiet; a metal cover or cowl for a hearth or stove; the hinged metal lid over the engine at the front of a motor vehicle
hood, hooded, hooding, hoods.transitive verbs
to supply or cover with a hood

Haran.noun
an ancient city of Mesopotamia in present day southeast Turkey. It was an important trading post and a religious center devoted to the Assyrian moon god. In the New Testament Haran is called  Charran (Acts 7:2-4) and is in the northwest part of Mesopotamia. Here, after leaving Ur, Abraham dwelt till his father Terah died:.Genesis 11:26. To this old homestead Isaac sent for a wife and Jacob fled from the wrath of Esau his brother. Haran was ravaged by the Assyrians in the time of king Hezekiah:.2Kings 19:10-13; Isaiah 37:10-12.

holey, holier, holiest.adjectives
having holes or many of them (his socks being almost worn out, had many holes in them)
hole, holes, holing, holed.verbs
transitive verb use.to put a hole in; to put or propel into a hole
intransitive verb use.to make a hole in something
hole.noun,.plural.holes
having holes or full of holes (the evolutionary theory is a holey holes concoction)
a hole is a hollow space in something solid, with an opening on one side (he took a shovel, dug a hole and buried his pet); a hole is an opening in something that goes right through it (these tiny insects eat holes in the leaves; kids with holes in the knees of their jeans); a hole is the home or hiding place of a mouse, rabbit or other small animal (a rabbit hole); a hole in a law, theory or argument is a fault or weakness that it has; a hole is also one of the nine or eighteen sections of a golf course;a  hole is one of the places on a golf course that the ball must drop into, usually marked by a flag; if you say that you need something or someone like a hole in the head, you are emphasizing that you do not want them and that they would only add to the problems that you already have; if you say that you are in a hole, you mean that you are in a difficult or embarrassing situation; if you get a hole in one in golf, you get the golf ball into the hole with a single stroke; if you pick holes in an argument or theory, you find weak points in it so that it is no longer valid

homely, homelier, homeliest.adjectives
not attractive or good looking (she made herself much more attractive by changing her inner thinking to that which is good); lacking.elegance, refinement and charm; of a simple or unpretentious.nature; plain; characteristic of the home or of home life
homeliness.noun

hardscrabble.adjective
earning a bare.subsistence, as on the land; marginal (the sharecropper's hardscrabble life); Marjorie Rawlings wrote about this type of life in one of her books The Yearling
hardscrabble.noun
barren or marginal farmland

high muckamuck.noun,.plural.high muckamucks
an important, often overbearing person; the big cheese; example
Word history: Perhaps one would not immediately associate the word 'high muckamuck' with Chinook Jargon, but it seems that English has borrowed the term. This pidgin language, which combines words from English, French, Nootka, Chinook and the Salishan languages, was formerly used by Native Americans and fur traders in the Pacific Northwest. In this language 'hayo makamak' meant 'plenty to eat' and is recorded in that sense in English contexts, the first one dated 1853, in which the phrase is spelled 'Hiou Muckamuck'. In 1856 we find the first recorded instance of the word meaning 'pompous person', 'person of importance in the Democratic State Journal published in Sacramento ("The professors, the high 'Muck-a-Mucks', tried fusion and produced confusion.") In this passage the Chinook Jargon term has been Anglicized in accord with its new meaning.

Elbert Green Hubbard, born June 19, 1856, Bloomington, Illiinois, U.S.A., died May 7, 1915 at sea off Ireland when the ocean liner Lusitania sank after being hit by a torpedo. Hubbard was one of the 1198 who perished out of the 1959 passengers on board.

Hubbard was an American editor, publisher and author of A Message to Garcia. In 1895 he produced the famous monthly booklets Little Journeys, pleasant biographical essays on famous persons, in which fact was interwoven with comment and satire. Hubbard also published The Philistine. In 1908 Hubbard started a second monthly The Fra. Valuable collections of his writings are Little Journeys, 14 vol. (1915) and Selected Writings, 14 vol. (1923). His Scrap Book (1923) and Note Book (1927) were published posthumously.....comprised with information from Encyclopedia Britannica.

.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
*
.