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Interlinked Dictionary© based on 
Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary (m-w.com)
and Star Dictionary
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cardio or cardi.prefix
to do with the physical heart
cardiovascular.adjective
of, relating.to.or.involving the heart and the blood vessels (cardiovascular disease)
carditis.noun
inflammation of the muscle.tissue of the heart

cybernetic.noun,.plural.cybernetics
cybernetics is a branch of science which involves studying the way electronic machines and human brains work and developing machines that do things or think rather like people; the study of communication and control processes in biological, mechanical and electronic systems, especially the comparison of these processes in biological and artificial systems; from Greek kubernan, meaning to govern
cybernetic.adjective
cybernetically.adverb
cyberneticist.or.cybernetician.noun,.plural.cyberneticists.or
cyberneticians

chore.noun,.plural.chores
a routine or minor.duty; a task; chores are one's daily or routine domestic tasks; the routine morning and evening tasks of a farmer, such as watering the crops and the feeding of livestock

Copernicus, Nicolaus 1473-1543 A.D. Polish astronomer who advanced the theory that the Earth and other planets revolve around the Sun, disrupting the Ptolemaic system of astronomy.
Copernican.adjective
of.or.relating.to.the theory of Copernicus that the Earth rotates daily on its axis and with the other planets in the solar system, revolves around the Sun in a spiral.configuration

carnivorous.adjective
of or relating to carnivores; flesh eating or predatory (a carnivorous bird); capable of trapping insects or other small organisms and absorbing.nutrients from them; insectivorous
carnivorously.adverb
carnivorousness.noun
carnivore.noun,.plural.carnivores
a flesh-eating animal; any of various.predatory, flesh-eating mammals of the order Carnivora, including the dogs, cats, bears, weasels, hyenas and raccoons; an insectivorous plant

conifer.noun,.plural.conifers
any of various mostly needle-leaved or scale-leaved, chiefly evergreen, cone-bearing gymnospermous trees or shrubs such as pines, spruces and firs; conifers are a group of trees and shrubs, for example pine trees and fir trees, that grow in cooler areas of the world, having fruit called cones and very thin leaves called needles which they do not normally lose in winter
coniferous.adjective

corm.noun,.plural.corms
a short, thick, solid underground stem that stores food as in the crocus or gladiolus plants

core.noun,.plural.cores
the hard or fibrous.central.part of certain fruits, such as the apple or pear, containing the seeds; the central or innermost part (the hard elastic core of a baseball; a rod with a hollow core); the basic or most.important part of something; the essence (a small core of dedicated.supporters; the core of the problem); the substance; a set of subjects or courses that form the base for a curriculum; in electricity, the soft iron rod in a coil or transformer that provides a path for and intensifies the magnetic field produced by the copper windings that is the main part of the electricity generating.process; in computers, the main memory made up of a series of tiny doughnut shaped masses of magnetic material, also called core memory; the central portion of Earth below the mantle, beginning at a depth of about 2,900 kilometers (1,800 miles) and this giant furnace consists of molten iron, nickel and other metals; this Earth's core is made up of a liquid outer core and a solid inner core; the part of a nuclear reactor where fission occurs; a cylindrical.mass.drilled.vertically into the Earth and then removed from it to determine composition or presence of oil or gas
core, cored, coring, cores.transitive verbs
to remove the core of (core apples)

Core.noun
Core (spelt Korah in the Old Testament and Core in the New Testament) was ringleader in a conspiracy to oust Moses and Aaron from being leaders as God had set them in positions to be.

Comprised with.Easton's Bible Dictionary: Korah as a Levite, the son of Izhar, the brother of Amram, the father of Moses and Aaron:.Exodus 6:21-24. The institution of the Aaronic priesthood and the Levitical service at Sinai was a great religious revolution. The old priesthood of the heads of families passed away. This gave rise to murmurings and discontent, while the Israelites were encamped at Kadesh for the first time, which came to a head in a rebellion against Moses and Aaron, headed by Korah, Dathan and Abiram. Two hundred and fifty princes."men of renown".i.e., well-known men from among the other tribes, joined this conspiracy. The whole company demanded of Moses and Aaron that the old state of things should be restored, alleging that."they took too much upon them":.Numbers 16:1-3. On the morning after the outbreak, Korah and his associates presented themselves at the door of the tabernacle and."took every man his censer and put fire in them and laid incense thereon". But immediately."fire from the Lord".burst forth and destroyed them all:.Numbers 16:35. Dathan and Abiram got swallowed up by the Earth:.Numbers 16:31-34. A plague thereafter began among the people who sympathized in the rebellion and was only stayed by Aaron’s appearing between the living and the dead and making."an atonement for the people":.Numbers 16:46-49. The descendants of the sons of Korah who did not participate in the rebellion afterwards rose to eminence in the Levitical service

chalk.noun,.plural.chalks
a soft, compact calcite, CaCO3, with varying amounts of silica, quartz, feldspar or other mineral impurities, generally gray-white or yellow-white and derived.chiefly from fossil seashells; a piece of chalk or chalklike substance in the form of a crayon, used for marking such as on a school blackboard or other surface; a small cube of chalk used in rubbing the tip of a billiard or pool cue to increase its friction with the cue ball
chalk, chalked, chalking, chalks.transitive verbs
to mark, draw or write with chalk (chalked his name on the blackboard); to rub or cover with chalk, as the tip of a billiard cue (the kids chalked up the sidewalk with colored chalk to play hopscotch)
chalk up.phrasal verb
to earn or score (chalk up points; chalk the evening up to great); to credit or ascribe (chalk it up to experience)
chalkiness.noun
chalky.adjective

crayon.noun,.plural.crayons
a stick of colored wax, charcoal or chalk, used for drawing; a drawing made with one of these sticks
crayon, crayoned, crayoning, crayons.transitive verbs
to draw, color or decorate with a stick of colored wax, charcoal or chalk
crayonist.noun,.plural.crayonists

cumin.noun
cumin is a sweet smelling spice and is popular in Indian cooking; it is the second most popular spice in the world, next to pepper; it's an annual Mediterranean herb (Cuminum cyminum) in the parsley family, having finely divided leaves and clusters of small white or pink flowers; the seedlike fruit of this plant used for seasoning, as in curry and chili powders; black cumin
black cumin.noun
an annual Eurasian herb (Nigella sativa) having bluish-white flowers and pungent black seeds used originally as a seasoning in Asian cuisines, now having world wide popularity

clench, clenched, clenching, clenches.transitive verbs
to close.tightly (clench one's teeth; clenched her fists); to grasp or grip tightly (clenched the steering wheel)
clench.noun,.plural.clenches
a tight grip or grasp; something, such as a mechanical.device, that clenches or holds fast

clinch, clinched, clinching, clinches.verbs
transitive verb use.if you clinch something you are trying to achieve, such as a business deal or victory in a contest, you succeed in obtaining it; to settle.definitely and conclusively; make final; to fix or secure a nail or bolt, for example by bending down or flattening the pointed end that protrudes; to fasten together in this way
intransitive verb use.to be held together securelyl in boxing to hold a boxing opponent's body with one or both arms to prevent or hinder his punches
clinch.noun,.plural.clinches
something, such as a clamp, that clinches
clincher.noun,.plural.clinchers
one that clinches, as, a nail, screw or bolt for clinching; a tool for clinching nails, screws or bolts; a point, fact or remark that settles something conclusively; a decisive.factor; the thing that clinches an uncertain.matter.settles it or provides a definite answer

cowpox.noun
a contagious skin disease of cattle, usually affecting the udder, that is thought to be caused by what was imagined to be a virus and characterized by the eruption of a pustular.rash; when this is vaccinated into the blood stream of humans, it was expected to confer.immunity to smallpox disease, but only caused increased sickness, failing even to eradicate the disease and even inducing outbreaks of it in populations who received it; also called vaccinia

Cretians, Cretes, Crete
an inhabitant of the island of Crete, one of the largest islands in the Mediterranean, about 140 miles long and 35 broad. It was at one time a very prosperous and populous island, having a hundred cities. The character of the people is described in Paul's quotation from one of their own people, Epimenides, described in Paul's epistle to Titus:.Titus 1:12 "One of themselves, even a prophet of their own, said, The Cretians are alway liars, evil beasts, slow bellies."

Crete is one of 13 administrative regions of Greece and the fifth largest island in the Mediterranean and the largest of the islands forming part of modern Greece. Area is 3,218 square miles (8,336 square km). Population (2008 estimate) 606,274. Crete's climate varies between temperate and subtropical, with an annual average precipitation of about 25 inches (640 mm) and hot, dry summers. Winter temperatures are relatively mild. Mountain air is temperate and cool and the mountains are often covered with snow in the winter. Palm trees flourish on the east coast and in the north, with cedar trees in the east as well. An array of plant species and flowers thrive in the moderate climate, many of them native to the island. Birds are abundant and there are some wild animals such as the agrími or wild goat.

The population speaks Greek, English, German and French. Cretans are known for their hospitality and vitality and much emphasis is placed on bonds between family members. Tourism.employs a large percentage of the population.

Only about one-third of Crete's total area can be cultivated and its farmers have traditionally worked small patches of land with little help from mechanization. Crete is one of Greece's leading regions for producing olives and olive oil, grapes, vegetables, such as tomatoes and potatoes, fruits, a lot of oranges and carob bean. Most of this produce is exported. Grapes are the largest export commodity and Crete's olive trees provide more than one-third of the total national olive crop. The island also produces barley and oats for domestic.consumption. Cretans also now use plastic hothouses to grow vegetables and flowers for the winter market in Europe. They also breed sheep and goats. Fishing satisfies.local needs.

The island's industry is in food-processing equipment such as grape and olive presses, building materials (quarried stone and marble, processed lime and building blocks) and a few ceramics, textiles, soap, leather and beverage-bottling enterprises.

There are two international airports, one in Iráklion and the other in Khánia, the towns in which the island's principal ports are also located. Ferries operate between Crete and mainland Greece as well as other islands in the Aegean.

Both elementary and secondary schooling is free for all children on the island. 

Crete is where the first European civilization, the Minoan, thrived. Minoan remains and sites are found at Knossós (Knosós), Phaestus (Faistós) and other locations throughout the island. A collection of most of the civilization's major artifacts ia at the Archaeological Museum in Iráklion. There is no evidence that humans arrived on Crete before about B.C.E. 6000. Where did they come from?....comprised with information from Encyclopedia Britannica.

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