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Interlinked Dictionary© based on 
Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary (m-w.com)
and Star Dictionary
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haul, hauled, hauling, hauls.verbs
transitive verb use.to pull or drag.forcibly; tug; to transport, as with a truck or cart; to compel to go (hauled the crooks to court); in nautical.terms, to change the course of a ship, especially in order to sail closer into the wind
intransitive verb use.to pull; tug; to lug; to provide.transportation; cart; to shift direction (the wind hauled to the east); in nautical terms, to change the course of a ship
haul.noun,.plural.hauls
the act of pulling or dragging (we loaded 2 hauls of fish today onto the ship); the act of transporting or carting; a distance, especially the distance over which something is pulled or transported (he drives for a long haul trucking company, so he's away for days at a time); something that is pulled or transported; a load; everything collected or acquired by a single effort; the take (a big haul of fish)
haul off.intransitive phrasal verb.
used with 'and' with a following verb describing a usually sudden and violent act; to draw back slightly, as in preparation for initiating an action (she hauled off and hit him for his remark); to shift operations to a new place; to move away
haul off.verb
take away by means of a vehicle (they carted off the old car to the junk yard; hauled off the garbage to the land fill)
hauler.noun,.plural.haulers

Herodotus, B.C.E. 5th century, a Greek historian who wrote about what was going on back then, including about the Persian wars, in his book called.History; he is known as the Father of History

holler, hollered, hollering, hollers.verbs
intransitive verb use.to yell or shout
transitive verb use.to shout out words or phrases
holler.noun,.plural.hollers
a yell or shout; a call

hatred.noun,.plural.hatreds
intense.animosity.or.hostility
hate, hated, hating, hates.verbs
transitive verb use.to feel hostility or animosity toward; do detest; to feel dislike or distaste for (hates washing dishes; hates winter); as often used in the Bible, the word 'hate' means 'to love less by comparison' or disliked, that is, to care not much for (Proverbs 14:20)
intransitive verb use.to feel hatred
hate.noun,.plural.hates
intense animosity or dislike; an object of detestation or hatred (my pet hate is tardiness)
hater.noun,.plural.haters
to love less than a comparison (the kids are haters of cutting the lawn, but hate less than that, leaving their playing to come in the house for lunch)
hateful.adjective
eliciting or deserving hatred; feeling or showing hatred; malevolent
hatefully.adverb
hatefulness.noun

helter-skelter.adverb
in disorderly.haste; confusedly; haphazardly; you use helter-skelter to describe something that is hurried and disorganized, especially when things happen very quickly, one after the other
He now faces another crisis in his helter-skelter existence
helter-skelter.adjective
carelesslyhurried and confused; haphazard
helter-skelter.noun
turmoil; confusion

howling.adjective
marked by the sound of howling (a howling wind); desolate; dreary (a howling wilderness it was with the wind and the dust blowing)
howl, howled, howling, howls.verbs
intransitive verb use.to utter or emit a long, mournful, plaintive sound; to wail; to cry loudly as in pain or sorrow
transitive verb use.to express or utter with a howl
howl.noun,.plural.howls
a long, wailing cry
howler.noun,.plural.howlers
one that howls (a dog that turned out to be a persistent howler; in the African night one can often hear the howlers, the jackals and hyenas sorrowful for lack of food); a howler monkey

hapless.adjective
unfortunate (a wretched life many of us have until we discover the secret to changing it); miserable; poor
haplessly.adverb
haplessness.noun

haply.adverb
by chance or accident (she haply came across the secret to life); if; if only

headlong.adjective
uncontrollably forceful or fast; steep; sheer; done with the head leading; headfirst (a headlong dive); impetuous; rash
headlong.adverb
with the head leading; headfirst (the runner slid headlong into third base); in an impetuous manner; rashly; at breakneck speed or with uncontrolled force

hepped up.adjective
enthused about; interested or preoccupied in something to a great degree (she is hepped on photography); keenly.aware of, knowledgeable about or interested in the latest trends or development

hightail, hightailed, hightailing, hightails.intransitive verbs
to go as fast as possible in retreating (hightailed out of town)

hew, hewed, hewn.or.hewed, hewing, hews.verbs
transitive verb use.to make or shape with or as if with an ax (hew a path through the underbrush); to cut down with an ax; fell (hew an oak tree)
intransitive verb use.to cut something by repeated blows, as of an ax; to adhere or conform.strictly; hold (he was hewed to the core in his studies)
hewer.noun,.plural.hewers

hallowed.adjective
sanctified; consecrated; highly venerated (a hallowed cemetery); sacrosanct (our hallowed war heroes)
hallow, hallowed, hallowing, hallows.transitive verbs
to make or set apart as holy; to respect or honor greatly; revere

hound.noun,.plural.hounds
a domestic dog of any of various.breeds.commonly.used for hunting, characteristically having drooping ears, a short coat and a deep, resonant voice; a dog; a contemptible person; a scoundrel; one who eagerly.pursues.something (a news hound)
hound, hounded, hounding, hounds.transitive verbs
to pursue relentlessly and tenaciously; harass (always being hounded with pop ups to get their newest browser even after trying it and not liking it); to urge.insistently; nag (hounded me until I agreed to cut my hair)
hounder.noun,.plural.hounders

hurl, hurled, hurling, hurls.verbs
transitive verb use.to throw with force; fling; to send with great vigor; thrust (hurled the shot put a long enough way to win the trophy); to throw down; overthrow; to utter.vehemently
intransitive verb use.to move with speed or force; hurtle; to throw something with force; to pitch the ball
hurl.noun,.plural.hurls
hurler.noun,.plural.hurlers

hurtle, hurtled, hurtling, hurtles.verbs
intransitive verb use.to move with or as if with great speed and a rushing noise (an express train that hurtled past)
transitive verb use.to fling with great force; hurl

hulk.noun,.plural.hulks
in nautical.terms, a heavy, unwieldy ship; the hull of an old, unseaworthy or wrecked ship; one, such as a person or an object, that is bulky, clumsy or unwieldy
hulk, hulked, hulking, hulks.intransitive verbs
to appear as a massive or towering form; loom (the big truck hulked out of the fog); to move clumsily

hull.noun,.plural.hulls
the dry outer covering of a fruit, seed or nut; a husk; the enlarged calyx of a fruit, such as a strawberry, that is usually green and easily detached; in nautical.terms, the frame or body of a ship, exclusive of masts, engines or superstructure; the main body of various other large vehicles, such as a tank, an airship or a flying boat; the outer casing of a rocket, guided missile or spaceship
hull, hulled, hulling, hulls.transitive verbs
to remove the hulls of fruit or seeds, grains, etc.

hyacinth.noun.also called jacinth
a bulbous Mediterranean plant (Hyacinthus orientalis) having narrow leaves and a terminal raceme of variously colored, usually fragrant flowers, with a funnel-shaped perianth; also called jacinth; any of several similar or related plants, such as the grape hyacinth; a deep purplish blue to vivid violet; a reddish or cinnamon-colored variety of transparent zircon, used as a gemstone; a blue precious stone, perhaps the sapphire, known in antiquity
hyacinthine.adjective
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