.
.
S i t e  S e a r c h

A_B_C_D_E_F_G_H_I_J_K_L_M_N_O_P_Q_R_S_T_U_V_W_XYZ

List of Topics__Ask Suby__Free Stuff__Questions Lists
Terms of Use__________________Privacy Policy

Scripture Notes New Testament

-Abia: Two listings: Abia means, my father is the Lord. Abia is the Greek form of the Hebrew spelling of Abijam or Abijah:.Matthew 1:7

In Luke 1:5, the name refers to the head of the eighth of the twenty four courses into which David divided the priests:.1Chronicles 24:10.

-words."became us" as in Hebrews 7:26. From Barnes Notes: "Was fitted to our condition. That is, there was that in our character and circumstances which demanded that a high priest for us should be personally holy. It was not requisite merely that he should have great power or that he should be of a rank superior to that of the Jewish priesthood, but there was a special propriety that he should surpass all others in moral purity. Other priests were mere mortal men and it was necessary that their office should pass to other hands. They were sinful men also and it was necessary that sacrifices should be made for themselves as well as others. We need however, a different priest. We need not only one who ever lives, but one who is perfectly holy and who has no need to bring an offering for himself. And this one with all the merit of whose sacrifice may be ours. Such an high priest we have in the person of the Lord Emmanuel."

-Capernum:.comprised from the.American Tract Society Bible Dictionary:.Capernum was the chief city of Galilee.(John 7:52).in the time of Christ, not mentioned before the captivity in Babylon. It lay on the northwest shore of the Sea of Galilee.(map), about five miles from the Jordan river and on the frequented route from Damascus.(map).to the Mediterranean.(map). This seems to have been the residence of Christ during the three years of his ministry, more than any other place. The brothers Andrew and Peter dwelt there and Christ often taught in the synagogue and wrought mighty works there:.Matthew 17:23; Mark 1:21-35; John 6:17,59. It is called."his own city":.Matthew 9:1; Mark 2:1. Its inhabitants unbelief and impenitence cast them down to destruction:.Matthew 11:20-24. The very name and site of Capernaum have been lost. Dr. Robinson, however, finds them at Khan Minyeh, on the northern border of the fine plain of Gennesareth, where ruins of some extent still remain and a copious fountain not far from the sea." 

-Lord of sabaoth: The transliteration of the Hebrew word tsebha'oth, meaning "hosts", "armies":.Romans 9:29; James 5:4. It may designate Jehovah as either 1) God of the armies of Earth or 2) God of the armies of the stars or 3) God of the unseen armies of angels or perhaps it may include all these ideas. At any rate it's better translated Lord of hosts.

Tenses.of Original Greek.(New Testament written in Greek):

Perfect Tense is a tense of verbs used in describing action that has been completed, also called second perfect tense, it being identical in meaning to that of the normal or 'first' perfect tense.(see just below) and has no additional effect on English translation. The classification merely represents a spelling variation in Greek.

In 1John 1:5.Strong's Exhaustive Concordance number in Greek for word 'heard' is 5754. This verb tense expresses action completed at the present time, formed in English by combining the present tense of 'have' with a past participle, as in 'He has spoken'; a verb used in the present perfect tense. Also same is the scripture in Romans 8:28; please see there.

Tense is present perfect. The present tense in Greek represents a simple statement of fact or reality viewed as occurring in actual time; in most cases this corresponds directly with the English present tense which is the tense of a verb that expresses action or state in the present time and is used of what occurs or is true at the time of speaking and of what is habitual or characteristic or is always or necessarily true. Some phrases which might be rendered as past tense in English will often occur in the present tense in Greek. These are termed 'historical presents' and such occurrences dramatize the event described as if the reader were there watching the event.

1John 1:7.Strong's Exhaustive Concordance number in Greek, 5719 for word 'cleanseth': synonyms for 'cleanseth' Strong's, 2513, denotes complete, total and absolute, as you will see as you read the tense, voice and mood below, freedom from defilements of the flesh and the world; Strong's 1506 denotes freedom from falsehoods.

Voice is active. The active voice represents the subject as the doer or performer of the action. e.g., in the sentence 'The boy hit the ball' the boy performs the action, used of a verb form or voice; expressing action rather than a state of being. Used of verbs such as run, speak and move, indicating that the subject of the sentence is performing or causing the action expressed by the verb. When the verb of a sentence is in the active voice, the SUBJECT is doing the acting, as in the sentence "John hit the ball." John (the subject of the sentence) acts in relation to the ball.

Tense is Aorist. The Greek aorist tense is characterized by its emphasis on punctiliar.(precise).action; that is, the concept of the verb is considered without regard for past, present or future time, that is, that which expresses action without indicating its completion or continuation. There is no direct or clear English equivalent for this tense, though it is generally rendered as a simple past tense in most translations.

The events described by the aorist tense are classified into a number of categories by grammarians. The most common of these include a view of the action as having begun from a certain point.('inceptive aorist').or having ended at a certain point.('cumulative {second} aorist').or merely existing at a certain point.'punctiliar aorist"). The categorization of other cases can be found in Greek reference grammars.

The English reader need not concern himself with most of these finer points concerning the aorist tense, since in most cases they cannot be rendered accurately in English translation, being fine points of Greek exegesis.(critical explanation or analysis of a text).only. The common practice of rendering an aorist by a simple English past tense should suffice in most cases.

Passive voice. The passive voice has to do with the subject being the object of the verb, for example.

Mood is Indicative. The indicative mood is a simple statement of fact. If an action really occurs or has occurred or will occur, it will be rendered in the indicative mood. 1John 1:9.Strong's Exhaustive Concordance number in Greek; 5777 for word 'cleanse'.

Mood is Subjunctive. The subjunctive mood is the mood of possibility and potentiality. The action described may or may not occur, depending upon circumstances. 1John 1:10.Strong's Exhaustive Concordance number in Greek is 5778 for tense of word 'sinned'.

Tense is Perfect. The perfect tense in Greek corresponds to the perfect tense in English and describes an action which is viewed as having been completed in the past, once and for all, not needing to be repeated.

Emmanuel's last cry from the cross, TETELESTAI.("It is finished!").is a good example of the perfect tense used in this sense, namely "It.(the atonement).has been accomplished, completely, once and for all time."

Certain antiquated verb forms in Greek, such as those related to seeing.('eidw').or knowing.('oida').will use the perfect tense in a manner equivalent to the normal past tense. These few cases are exception to the normal rule and do not alter the normal connotation of the perfect tense stated above.
The boy hit the ball," the boy performs the action.

More Greek Tenses:

Tense: Pluperfect. Of, relating to or being a verb.tense used to express action completed before a specified or implied past time; that is, it indicates an event viewed as having been once and for all accomplished in past time; it means 'more than perfect', 'supremely accomplished'; 'ideal' (He has won a reputation as a pluperfect bureaucrat); the pluperfect tense is formed in English with the past participle of a verb and the auxiliary had, as had learned in the sentence 'He had learned to type by the time the semester was over'. The English pluperfect is normally formed with the past tense of the "helping" verbs "to have" or "to be", plus the past participle, e.g., "He had finished." The English perfect is formed by the present tense of the helping verb plus the past participle, e.g., "He has finished".

In contrast, the perfect tense reflects the final completion of an action at the present moment described.

Strong's Exhaustive Concordance number in Greek, 5779: The pluperfect tense in Greek occurs rarely. It corresponds in a single Greek word to the sense of the English pluperfect. In translation the Greek pluperfect may not always follow the rendering of the English pluperfect, due to excessive wordiness.

For more notes on original Greek words, tenses, etc., see Strong's Exhaustive Concordance numbers 5625 to 5877.

More Greek Moods:

Mood: Participle: The Greek participle corresponds for the most part to the English participle, reflecting "- ing" or "- ed" being suffixed to the basic verb form. The participle can be used either like a verb or a noun, as in English and thus is often termed a "verbal noun".

-Simon the sorcerer: used his magical arts among the Samaritans:.Acts 8:9-11. He afterwards became a professed convert to the faith under the preaching of Philip the deacon and evangelist.(verses 12,13). His profession was however, soon found to be hollow. His conduct called forth from Peter a stern.rebuke:.Acts 8:18-24. From this moment nothing more is said of him.

-Spoil the Egyptians.(Exodus 3:22): comprised from Barnes New Testament Notes: The Egyptians would doubtless have refused had not their feelings toward Moses and the people been changed under Creator's influence, by calamities in which they recognized a divine interposition, which also they rightly attributed to the obstinacy of their own king:.Exodus 10:7. The Hebrew women were to make the demand and were to make it of Egyptian women who would of course be especially moved to compliance by the loss of their children and the fear of a recurrence of calamity, perhaps also by a sense of the fitness of the request in connection with a religious festival.

-Tetrarch: the ruler over the fourth part of a province; but the word denotes a ruler of an entire province generally.(see also ethnarch):.Matthew 14:1; Luke 3:1,19; 9:7; Acts 13:1. Herod and Phasael.(a descendant of Judah, son of Eshton:.1Chronicles 4:12), the sons of Antipater, were the first tetrarchs in Palestine. Herod the tetrarch had the title of king:.Matthew 14:9.

-Time of reformation:.comprised with.Barnes New Testament Notes....reformation refers to putting a thing in a right condition, making it better or raising up and restoring that which is fallen down:.Acts 3:21. The idea here is, that those ordinances of the Old Testament were only temporary in their nature and were designed to endure till a more perfect system should be introduced, a system which began in the time of Christ on Earth and the gentle edging the world away from its ego ways, which had a high point in growth in the 16th century. When this 16th century reformation began, it was referred to as the 'fulness of times':.Ephesians 1:10. The Old Testament ordinances were of value to introduce that better system which the New Testament talks about, but the ordinances of the Old Testament were not adapted to purify the conscience and remove the stains of guilt from the soul:.Hebrews 9:6-15. Only the sacrifice of Emmanuel could do that.

The Reformation period begun in the 16th century continues today. Reformers are those seeing what needs changing and doing something about it. But how? Those back then were martyred by the opposition, as these also were.

Tychicus: a disciple and companion of the apostle Paul.(2Timothy 1:11), employed to carry Paul's letters to several churches. He was of the province of Asia and accompanied Paul in his journey from Corinth to Jerusalem:.Acts 20:4. Tychicus carried epistles to the Colossians, Ephesians and to Timothy:.Ephesians 6:21,22; Colossians 4:7,8; 2Timothy 4:12. Paul had intentions of sending him into Crete, in the absence of Titus:.Titus 3:12.
 

.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
*