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Based on Merriam-Webster's Collegiate® Dictionary
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tarif, tariff, tariffed, tariffing, tariffs
a list or system of duties imposed by a government on imported or exported goods; duties or a duty imposed by a government on imported or exported goods; a schedule of prices or fees; to fix a duty or price on

tenable, tenability.or.tenableness, tenably
capable of being maintained in argument; rationally defensible (a tenable theory, unlike the theory of evolution); capable of being held against assault; defensible

therewith
with that, this, or it; in addition to that; immediately thereafter

thus, thusly
(either is correct, but 'thus' is regarded as being language proper)
to this degree or extent; in this or that manner or way; because of this or that; hence; consequently; as an example 

token, tokened, tokening, tokens
something serving as an indication, a proof, or an expression of something else; a sign; something that signifies or evidences authority, validity, or identity (the scepter is a token of regal status); a distinguishing feature or characteristic; a keepsake or souvenir; a piece of stamped metal used as a substitute for currency (subway tokens); to betoken or symbolize; portend; done as an indication or a pledge (a token payment); perfunctory; minimal (a token gesture of reconciliation); token resistance; merely symbolic (a token woman on the board of directors); by the same token; in like manner; similarly; in token of; as an indication of (a ring given in token of love)

totalitarian, totalitarianism
of, relating to, being, or imposing a form of communist government in which the political authority exercises absolute and centralized control over virtually all aspects of citizens' life through prescribing and licensing human activity and production, the individual is subordinated to the state, and opposing political and cultural expression is suppressed (a totalitarian regime crushes all autonomous institutions in its drive to seize the human soul ...Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr.); a practitioner or supporter of a government practicing such doctrines of demons

tout, touted, touting, touts
to solicit customers, votes, or patronage, especially in a brazen way; to praise or recommend highly; publicize; to solicit or importune (street vendors who were touting pedestrians); one who solicits customers brazenly or persistently

transcend, transcended, transcending, transcends
to pass beyond the limits of (emotions that transcend understanding).; to be greater than, as in intensity or power; surpass (love that transcends infatuation); excel; to exist above and independent of (material experience or the universe); to be transcendent; excel

treatise
a systematic, usually extensive written discourse on a subject

treaty, treaties
a formal agreement between two or more states, as in reference to terms of peace or trade; the document in which such an agreement is set down; a contract or an agreement

Treaty of Paris, September 3, 1783
signed by Great Britain and the United States concluding the American Revolution. By its terms, Great Britain recognized its former 13 colonies (*) as the free and sovereign United States of America.comprised with Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 99. © 1993-1998 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

Treaty of Washington
an agreement signed in Washington, D.C. on May 8, 1871 by the United States and Great Britain that provided for both countries to submit their disputes to arbitration (Tribunal of Arbitration), stipulated that Britain would pay $37,500,000 as direct indemnity (compensation for damage), pay for shipping sunk as decided by an Admiralty Court in New York City, grant to the United States perpetual rights to navigate the St. Lawrence River through Quebec and provided for boundary agreements re the Lake of the Woods and Point Roberts, B.C.

(No confederation in Canada: If Canada was really a confederation and became a nation in 1867, Britain couldn't have then agreed to this, as it would have been out of her realm. Canada's myth of confederation in 1867 is still erroneously taught by those ignorant of the facts, so Canada.still.celebrates its 'birthday' every July 1st, calculating its age dating back to 1867.

Canada, not having any say of her own in affairs affecting her, could say little of any impact as the US and Britain put any concerns by Canadians on the back burner by means of this Treaty of Washington, allowing equal navigation of the St. Lawrence River where it traverses the Province of Quebec; relinquishing the territories of the Lake of the Woods, Point Roberts and the San Juan Islands.(northwestern Washington, at the entrance to Puget Sound. The islands lie to the east of Vancouver Island, B.C.) and granting equal rights for ten years to the fisheries. This could not have happened had Canada been a country on her own, as she would not have been responsible for the things that occurred that the US was demanding reparation from Britain for; this occurred 4 years after Canada'a supposed confederation on July 1, 1867; the belief that Canada has confederated is contrary to fact, proving some past to recent past government administrations in Canada have been feeding us fiction)

One major point at issue was an American demand that Britain pay reparations for Union ships destroyed during the American Civil War by Confederate raiders built and equipped in England (see Alabama Claims in an encyclopedia). Also at issue was the San Juan Boundary Dispute involving rival claims by the two nations to the San Juan islands at the north end of Puget Sound. The islands could have belonged to either country because of faulty wording in the treaty that settled the Northwest Boundary Dispute in 1846. Both points were eventually settled in favor of the U.S. The treaty also provided for a commission to settle the North Atlantic fishing dispute; as a result both countries exchanged various fishing, navigational and customs privileges in North America..Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 99. © 1993-1998 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved

Trent Affair
an incident during the American Civil War that severely tested diplomatic relations between the United States and Britain. Britain supported the Confederacy. On November 8, 1861, Captain Charles Wilkes of the U.S. vessel.San Jacinto.intercepted at sea the British mail steamer.Trent, bound for Europe from Havana, Cuba. He took from the ship two Confederate commissioners who were among the passengers, James Mason, who was accredited to Britain and John Slidell, who was accredited to France. The two diplomats were subsequently held as prisoners in Boston, but Britain demanded their release on the ground that they had been forcibly taken from a neutral vessel on the high seas upon a voyage from one neutral point to another and that therefore Wilkes's action had been illegal. Wilkes had been hailed as a hero in the U.S. and the possibility of war between the two countries seemed imminent. On December 26, however, U.S. Secretary of State William Henry Seward repudiated the capture of the prisoners, who were released the following January..Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 99. © 1993-1998 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

tribunal
a committee or board appointed to adjudicate in a particular matter; something that has the power to determine or judge (the tribunal of public opinion); a seat or court of justice; the bench on which a judge or other presiding officer sits in court

Joseph Philippe Pierre Ives Elliott Trudeau.(15th prime minister of Canada (1968-1979, 1980-1984)
Pierre Elliott Trudeau
former lawyer; did postgraduate work in political science, law and economics at the London School of Economics, University of Paris and Harvard; should have known better and maybe he did know better, when he talked of 'repatriating the constitution', 'repatriating' as used, being a misnomer itself, for how does one 'repatriate' to Canada that which originated in another country? (*).comprised with Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 99. © 1993-1998 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved

Charles Tupper.sixth prime minister of Canada, 1896
Charles Tupper
In 1864, he arranged the Charlottetown Conference

tyrant
one who seized sovereignty (supreme and independent political authority) illegally; a despot; any person who exercises authority in an oppressive manner 
tyranny
the office, authority, government or jurisdiction of a tyrant 

tyrannical.also.tyrannic
of or relating to a tyrant or tyranny (a tyrannical government); characteristic of a tyrant or tyranny; despotic and oppressive (a tyrannical supervisor)
tyrannically, tyrannicalness, tyranny,tyrannies
a government in which a single ruler is vested with absolute power; the office, authority, or jurisdiction of an absolute ruler

tenure, tenurial, tenurially
the act, fact, or condition of holding something in one's possession, as real estate or an office; occupation; a period during which something is held; the status of holding one's position on a permanent basis without periodic contract renewals (a teacher granted tenure on a faculty); to hold

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